19
May
11

When Redesign is Bad for Business

Since the launch of Starbucks in 1971, the brand has often been imitated. Marketing strategies, packaging, and even logo design and layout have been mimicked to compete with the swanky franchise and entice customers. McDonald’s is taking this imitation to the next level with a new store design that has been fashioned after the sleek and stylish Starbucks store model. In redesigning the look and feel of McDonald’s stores, the hope is that more high-end customers will be attracted to dine-in, linger and perhaps spend a few extra bucks. Although the McDonald’s redesign is to increase competitive edge, the renovations may prove to be counterproductive.

In an interview by USA Today, Max Carmona, McDonald’s senior director of U.S. restaurant design states, “we want restaurants to reflect our brand personality, which is one of being playful, energetic and optimistic.” However, as McDonald’s moves to make its design more contemporary and modern, one cannot help but recognize the immense similarities it has to the Starbucks model and how these changes are morphing drastically from the traditional McDonald’s image and brand personality.

Traditionally, McDonald’s stores have been known for their bright signature colors of cherry red and golden yellow, Ronald McDonald (the cartoon clown mascot), large golden arches and a child friendly environment equipped with playgrounds. The people drawn to eat in the stores are most often parents with children who enjoy the playful environment. Replacing these bright colors, toys and playground equipment with padded recliners, posh wooden tables and warm painted interiors will contradict the image they have in place. It will attract an adult customer base, but it will also derail families with younger children from visiting.

A January Ad Age report estimated Happy Meals account for about 10 percent of total McDonald’s sales. “If the newly remodeled McDonalds become too popular with leisurely adults seeking a relaxing atmosphere, McDonalds could alienate a customer base that has been the cornerstone of their growth for decades,” states Cynthia Wilson, consumer writer for Investor Place.

Reinventing the look and feel of a store can greatly enhance competitive edge. However, staying inline with the current image may prove more effective for the McDonalds. The Golden Arches better be sure the push towards laptop-toting professionals doesn’t alienate this important customer base, or else it will find its renovations not just costly but counterproductive.

Share your predictions and comments with us concerning McDonald’s redesign. Share with us on Facebook at Weise Communications and follow @Weise_Ideas on Twitter


1 Response to “When Redesign is Bad for Business”


  1. October 1, 2013 at 3:45 pm

    It is not just the adult perspective you see toys 5 month old
    in most reviews. These toys are among the top rated
    baby gifts for Christmas 2011 is Angry Birds Knock
    on Wood.


Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s


Share The Side Note

Facebook Twitter More...

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,100 other followers

Weise Twitter

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

Archives


%d bloggers like this: